Archive for Art

Gary T. Erbe

“Seascape” by Gary Erbe

Gary T. Erbe was born in 1944 in Union City, NJ where he maintained his studio for 35 years. Self taught, he began painting in 1965. In the early years, every painting Erbe created would become a learning experience bringing him closer to understanding what makes good art. This was a challenging time for him. Then he discovered and became interested in Trompe l’oeil painting. In 1969, he conceived a way of creating Trompe l’oeil paintings that would be contemporary and different from the 19th Century Trompe l’oeil masters and coined the term “Levitational Realism”. In 1970, he quit his job as an engraver to pursue art fulltime and in the mid 1970’s, he began to explore the idiom of abstraction and cubism and how it can be applied to Trompe l’oeil painting. The idea of integrating modern principles into his painting was very challenging and exciting. Bridging the gap between modern art and realism would be his vision. In fact, today his work has less to do with Trompe l’oeil and more to do with the creative process.

Erbe’s work is the creation of a synthetic sense of space derived from the combination of flat space integrated with abstract forms exaggerated and enhanced by shadow, light and color. Mr. Erbe has exhibited extensively throughout the world and has garnered many awards for his paintings. Gary T. Erbe served as President of Allied Artists of America, Inc. from 1994-2005.

To see Gary’s work available for reproduction click here!

“Burning of the White House by British Soldiers”

“Burning of the White House by British Soldiers” by Tom Freeman. The White House Historical Association

Under President James Madison’s watch, British forces , led by Major Robert Ross, set fire to the White House on August 24, 1814, in retaliation for the American destruction of Port Dover in Upper Canada.

Other buildings throughout Washington were set ablaze as well. However, less than a day later, a sudden thunderstorm struck, pouring needed water upon the flames, and thus saving the Capitol. This event became known as “The Storm that Saved Washington”!

 

 

Purchase a reproduction of this piece on RequestAPrint.

Author: Janet Moy

Michael P. Smith (1937-2008)

During his nearly forty-year career, photographer Michael P. Smith (1937-2008) immersed himself in the larger world of New Orleans’s musical culture. At public events, from music festivals and concerts to street parades both mournful and celebratory, Smith was there with his Nikon cameras and, in later years, a tape recorder.

Beyond his public presence, Smith earned the trust of musicians and churchgoers who let him into their private lives. These relationships allowed him to create a photographic record bearing witness to often elusive cultural and spiritual events.

Though documentary in style, his photographs transcend the mere description of their subjects, pushing viewers to consider the cultural diversity of the world around them.

To view his collection of work go to RequestAPrint.net

History of the Purple Heart

“GEORGE WASHINGTON” by Artist Unknown from the US Navy Art Collection gallery on RequestAPrint.net

On this day in 1782, George Washington created the “Badge for Military Merit”; this award was first given to three soldiers of the Revolutionary War. In 1932, on the 200th anniversary of George Washington’s birthday, the U.S. Department of War resurrected this award as the “Order of the Purple Heart”. Since then, 1.8 million have received the award.

To purchase a reproduction of “George Washington” on RequestAPrint, click this link: requestaprint.net/navy

References: This Day In History: History.com and The Purple Heart