Archive for Photography

GPO Official Rating: Level 3

It’s all in the details. We submitted RequestAPrint samples to the U.S. Government Publishing Office and our company has been rated as a Quality Level 3, the highest rating for large format digital printing. We work hard to make sure the prints you receive are the best they can be, and it’s nice that the GPO agrees. Give us a try.

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival


The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival (Jazz Fest) will be happening April 27 – 29. The Historic New Orleans Collection is setting up their tent at the festival and offering RequestAPrint reproductions from the Michael P. Smith collection of historical Jazz Fest photographs. The display features large framed prints and several informational panels produced on our Print N’ Stick material, You can also search their collection and order your prints at RequestAPrint.net.

High Resolution

Resolution is defined as pixels per inch (ppi) or more commonly, dots per inch (dpi). You can state the resolution in one of two ways, the dots per inch and the number of inches (300 dpi at 10 in.) or the actual pixel dimensions (3000 pixels by 2400 pixels – the size of a 10 x 8 print at 300 dpi). As a rule of thumb, images when sized to their printed or displayed dimensions would be at 72 dpi for use on the web, 150 dpi for ink jet printers, and 300 dpi for commercial printing. Supplying images at a resolution slightly higher than what is required is a good thing, and images at a lower resolution will need to be “bumped up” degrading the quality, Photography should be done at the highest camera resolution and the original file saved and backed up. Never modify the original file. Make a copy to edit and size.

Image Credit: http://www.tatge.biz/working-with-images-hi-res-vs-lo-res/

Sailing on the Brig Niagara

Heave…Ho…

This isn’t a sightseeing boat ride.  It’s called sail training, and it is.  The view is mainly of the sails and  ropes. They are everywhere.  Neatly stowed or coiled.  This is absolutely the best way to learn what is required to crew a 1813 square rigger.

Captain “Goldie” commanded the ship from the stern and the crew echoed his commands and reported on their execution.

Senior Captain Walter explained the operation of the brig Niagra on the quarter deck.  The love of the ship was very apparent and his description of the ship as an organic vessel was something I had never considered.  The beams, the masts, the sails and the ropes were constructed from things that were alive.  He stressed that when maneuvering the ship the stresses placed on “her” should be considered.

It was surprising to learn that “she” had a 11 to 13 ft. draft, and was constructed to clear the sand bar at Erie harbor and sail on Lake Erie, which is a relatively shallow lake.

The current brig Niagra is a replica of Admiral Perry’s flagship and was originally constructed for only that battle.  Perry transfered to the Niagra from the badly damaged Lawrence during the heat of the battle of Lake Erie.  She also flew the battle flag, emboldened with the words of Admiral Lawrence “Don’t give up the ship”

See all they have to offer on their website http://www.flagshipniagara.org/